James Cleveland, Ugly Delicious, Sanctification Through Song - Stuff We Like #7

It's what we do when we do what we do.

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Songs I Like

You're the Best Thing That Ever Happened, by James Cleveland

Gospel music gets into your soul a certain way that no other genre can. It's not necessarily one that comes natural to me but it sure does resonate in a way that other genres of music simply don't. Now make it a live recording and you've got pure Holy Spirit fire. Check out the 2:02 mark when people wild out at the chorus and tell me you don't get caught up in glory. It's amazing how saying "Jesus is the best thing" comes across so vastly different than when James Cleveland sings it. A further reminder that song and praise matters to our spiritual health.

Live at the Harlem Square Club, by Sam Cooke

Since we're on the live performance tip, this might be my favorite of all time. You can just feel the beads of sweat forming on your head as one of the greatest soul singers gets the club jumping. A good album will make you want to see the artist live in concert at any point in the future. This album makes me wish I was packed inside this Miami hotspot in January 1963 just this one time. It's one of the few reasons why I think we someone should build a time machine.

Shows I Like

Ugly Delicious (Netflix)

I love food television because I really love food. There is great appeal for me in watching an Asian-American chef work who wants to believe in the unifying power of food while navigating the complexities of race and class that are thoroughly intertwined with cuisine. David Chang can be abrasive but he has the courage to ask questions and at least explore and listen, even if he doesn't agree. There's an air of confession and therapy in this show that makes it vastly different from most food and travel shows out there. The "fried chicken" and "fried rice" episodes alone make for thought-provoking television.

Bojack Horseman (Netflix)

Animated shows are typically meant to tickle your funny bone and not do much else. What sets Bojack Horseman apart from the Simpsons and Bob's Burgers of television is that not only is it ridiculous (a pseudo-Mr.Ed in a world of anthropomorphic animals who dwell alongside humans) but it poignantly and thoughtfully explores issues of mental health, addiction, and self-destruction in ways you don't see in the entertainment industry. If anything, it's an advantage for this show to be animated as it allows viewers to enter into these worlds and thinking about these issues without being so visceral that they get lost in them. But even if that sounds heavy, it's also hilarious, fun, and worth watching.

Articles I Like

Sanctification Through Song, by Ann Lowrey Forster

We talked about this last week in Grace Academy, how singing aloud is part and parcel of worship that is incarnated and embodied. Our engagement in this singing praise with God's people on a day set aside for His worship is not because He needs us to do it but because we need to do it so we might know Him better. Our faith is strengthened, our countenance is changed, our hope is renewed not just by what we say but by what we sing.